An Open Heart

An Open Heart

According to Buddhist psychology, by pushing away the painful aspects of experience we isolate ourselves from the capacity to love. We justifiably complain of feeling unreal because we are busy keeping ourselves at arm’s length by listening to the inner dialogue urging us toward our favorite distraction (sex, food, computer games, etc.).

Opening to emotion deepens the experience, of self and others. Being with the pain and disappointment, an invariable part of human relationships, helps us to expand. Psychologist John Welwood poetically refers to a broken heart as one that is broken “wide open”. He goes on to say, “What actually breaks open is the defensive shell around the heart that we have constructed to try to protect our soft spot, where we feel most deeply affected by life.”

This is not an easy task.  The soul’s journey rarely is.

Share, Email or Print this...
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Email this to someone
email
Print this page
Print

Related Posts

“Thanks!”

“Thanks!”

Exploring how kindness and appreciation flow back and forth in couples, Barbara Fredrickson, Ph.D, examined how people habitually express appreciation to their partners. Turns out some people say “thanks” better than others.

True Connection Matters

True Connection Matters

Our body, sculpted by the biological forces of natural selection over millennia, was not designed for abstractions of long-distance love. It hungers for moments of oneness.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.