Equanimity

Equanimity

The great tapestry of our lives can be seen in the rhythm of the changing seasons. If we pause and step back, extraordinary patterns of flow and movement emerge. Even now, as we settle into winter, new life is forming from the fallen decay. Consider what has led you to this moment. Sitting and reading this blog is no coincidence. Each experience has played a part in creating the whole.

In Loving Kindness, Sharon Salzberg writes: “Sometimes, of course, it is hard to embrace the painful, difficult times as being part of that whole, to feel as connected to those harsh events as we do when things are pleasant, easy, and fortunate. But really our lives are composed of continual change without ceasing.”

Practicing equanimity can help us let go of our aversion to what is unpleasant. It asks that we see things as they are. Mindfulness-based therapy and meditation are excellent ways to practice being fully present with the changing experiences of life. In doing so, the unavoidable is compassionately accepted.  This includes feelings and thoughts.

Equanimity’s strength derives from a combination of understanding and trust. To see the changing nature, to see the impermanence, to see that constant flow of pleasant painful events outside our control – that is freedom.

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